Print

Throughout our structure, a traditional "Right of Appeal" ought to prevail, so that minority opinion will be heard and personal grievances receive careful consideration.

The Right of Appeal is enshrined in Concept Five:

Throughout our structure, a traditional "Right of Appeal" ought to prevail, so that minority opinion will be heard and personal grievances receive careful consideration.

The A.A. Service Manual goes on to state that "Whenever the minority considers an issue to be such a grave one that a mistaken decision could serously affect A.A. as a whole, it should then charge itself with the actual duty of presenting a minority report to the Conference."

The Minority Opinion

The Standing Rules of Order for the GSA World Service Conference (based on both Robert's Rules of Order and the Twelve Concepts for World Service) explain the procedure for requesting the minority opinion.

After a motion is voted on, the Conference Chair asks if anyone in the minority (i.e., if the motion passed, those who voted against it; if the motion failed, those who voted for it) would like to speak for the minority.

  1. If yes, those in the minority may present their case for two minutes.
  2. Three people may speak.
  3. Then the Conference Chair asks if anyone in the majority wants to change their vote after hearing the minority.
  4. If no one indicates that they want to change their vote after hearing the minority, the motion rests.
  5. If yes, the Conference Chair asks for a motion to re-Consider the Question. If seconded, such a motion opens the original question for a revote.

Not every group conscience meeting will use such a formal structure, but when a question excites strong feelings on both sides, it's important for the person chairing the meeting to ask for the minority opinion. Not every vote will go the way we want it to, but we can always be sure we will be heard.

Grievances

Personal Grievances

Grievances with other members that are not related to GSA service are often best resolved by the application of the Twelve Steps. Because resentments can lead us to eat compulsively, it's important to discuss these grievances with your sponsor or another trusted GSA member.

Safety

Your personal safety is of utmost importance in our GreySheet community. While it is extremely rare for such things to happen, there have been instances where one member behaved in an inappropriate and threatening way to another. The GSAWS Board of Trustees recently formed a Personal Safety Committee to address these questions in detail. If you feel threatened or uncomfortable with the behavior of another member in or outside of a meeting, please speak with your sponsor or a trusted servant of that group.

Grievances with Service Bodies and Trusted Servants

The Right of Appeal also provides a path for addressing personal grievances that members may have with the conduct of service bodies to which they belong. Any member may speak to the Board of Trustees about matters such as